Official Website of Sarah E. Rippel, BS, CPT, FMS

-Cross-Training for Runners-


The 2009 Avia Austin Triathlon - Olympic distance

Last week I gave a presentation to a group of beginning runners at Fleet Feet Sports of Baton Rouge.

The topic? Cross-Training.

When I was asked to do a presentation, I was excited. I love being able to spread a positive message and help out those who may benefit from my know-how and experience.

When I was told that the topic was cross-training, I thought “piece of cake!”

Well, I was kinda wrong…the only way it wasn’t a piece of cake was in that (in typical Sarah fashion) I had a hard time keeping things SIMPLE.

You see, there is TONS I could say about this subject. In fact, I don’t think I could ever reach an end-point.

But, being told to keep it basic and focused on an audience of beginning runners helped me keep my focus!

Here is my outline of the presentation:

Cross-Training for Runners

By Sarah E. Rippel, BS, CPT

WHY CROSS-TRAIN?

1. IT KEEPS YA FROM GETTIN’ HURT!

a. Promote balance between muscle groups

i. Helps strengthen your non-running muscles and rests your running muscles.

ii. Yoga, Pilates, and weight training are great for promoting overall body balance, and yoga/Pilates also help improve flexibility.

*In addition, there are numerous bodyweight mobility, flexibility, and strength movements that are ideal for runners!

iii. Low-impact activities, such as swimming, cycling, and deep water running are great because they are easy on the joints.

iv. The activities mentioned above are ideal for rehabbing a running-induced injury!

2. IT CAN IMPROVE YOUR CARDIOVASCULAR FITNESS!

a. The activities mentioned above – swimming, cycling, and deep water running – are great forms of aerobic exercise

b. In addition, circuit training can build both strength and cardiovascular fitness.

3. IT CAN KEEP YA FROM GETTIN’ BORED!

a. Runners tend to love to run, and are notorious for basically sticking with that!

b. After a while, this obviously gets old!

BASICALLY, THERE ARE NO REASONS NOT TO CROSS-TRAIN!

HOW OFTEN & HOW MUCH?

I would suggest twice a week in addition to your routine

A little is better than none at all! 30-45 min

WHAT ACTIVITIES?

  1. Strength training
  2. Swimming
  3. Cycling
  4. Deep Water Running
  5. Rowing
  6. Stand-Up Paddle Boarding (SUP)
  7. Yoga/Pilates

I am going to focus on strength training in this presentation, since that is what I emphasize with most of my clients.

In a perfect world, a strength training routine would be well-rounded and include the following components:

  1. SELF MYOFASCIAL RELEASE (SMR)
  2. WARM-UP (RAMP – Range of motion-mobility, activation, movement prep; include elastic/power training in the form of low amplitude jumps)
  3. CORE TRAINING
  4. STRENGTH TRAINING (including hybrid exercises & supersets/circuits; single-leg work)
  5. METABOLIC TRAINING
  6. RECOVERY/REGENERATION

I’m not going to go into great detail about each, but suffice it to say that your training routine can be thought of as a puzzle that is comprised of many pieces. Separately, they are okay, but the true impact of each is realized when they are all addressed to some degree. Nutrition is another part of the puzzle, but one that is obviously off subject for my presentation today. 🙂

This may seem like a ton of info, but don’t be overwhelmed. This outline is basically a “road map” of what I would do if you were a client with no limitations. It gives a general idea of what you should address, as no two people are the same, and different exercises work better for some than others. You shouldn’t have to spend more than 45 minutes going through a complete routine. There is no need to spend great amounts of time in between drills/exercises, and the entire body is addressed. Also, this routine can be done virtually anywhere!

So, without further ado, I give you…

THE “RIPPEL EFFECT REALLY SIMPLE RUNNER’S ROUTINE”

1. SELF MYOFASCIAL RELEASE – 5 min

a. Can be thought of as a deep tissue massage done on your own

b. Dual function of preparing the body and mind

*De-stress

*Helps with circulation, tissue extensibility, neuromuscular activation, and coordination (to name a few)!

c. I recommend SMR for everyone.

*The simple fact that the majority of us spend a great amount of time in the seated position is reason enough! Our posture takes a toll.

*Can be done daily, just like flexibility/mobility work

*Most people spend zero time addressing flexibility, and SMR is an easy, “feel good” way to get it done!

d. For runners, it allows the “typical” tight/stressed areas to be addressed, thus improving overall body balance, flexibility, and helping with injury reduction.

  1. Calves
  2. Hams
  3. Hip Flexors
  4. Piriformis
  5. IT Band
  6. Pec/Anterior Shoulder
  7. Thoracic Spine

*I use a foam roller, Lacrosse ball, and two tennis balls taped together (forming a “peanut”) to perform various SMR strategies on the above areas. I also have a set of air-filled balls of varying sizes that are useful when needing to target specific areas. There are numerous other products out there, including the Trigger Point products.

2. RAMP (aka Warm-Up): 30s ea; 5-10 min

a. Get the body “ramped up” for work!

b. Improve ROM/mobility of tight areas, activate weak links, prepare for movement, and improve running economy

c. Great little routine to do before EVERY workout!

d. Routine:

  1. ½ Kneeling Hip Flexor Stretch
  2. Marching Bridges
  3. Squat to Stand
  4. Wall Slides
  5. Forward/Backward Jumps
  6. High Knee Walk
  7. Spiderman Walking Lunges
  8. Side to Side Jumps
  9. Lateral Squat
  10. Skips
  11. Carioca (do side to side covering 10-15 yds)
  12. Lateral Shuffle (do side to side covering 10-15 yds)

3. CORE TRAINING: 3-5 min

a. Routine: perform 2-3 rounds of 2 exercises

  1. Static Stabilization Exercise – held for time – Plank – 30-60s
  2. Dynamic Stabilization Exercise – done for reps or a timed set of reps – Accordions – 8-10 reps or 30s of reps

4. STRENGTH TRAINING: 10-20 min

a. Use hybrid exercises (combine several movements) and supersets/circuits to work the entire body and promote cardiovascular fitness without wasting time!

b. Include single-leg work, because running is performed on one leg at a time!

c. Routine: 2-3 rounds of each superset, taking no more than 30s in between exercises; 10-12 reps with bodyweight or moderate weight (5-10 lb dumbbells for women/10-20 lb for men)

Superset:

  1. Dumbbell Squat, Curl, Press
  2. Single-Leg Contra- & Ipsi-Lateral Reach

Superset:

  1. Dumbbell Deadlift to Bent-Over Row
  2. Pushups

Superset:

  1. Bodyweight or Dumbbell Step-Up to Single-Leg Balance
  2. Dumbbell Scaption

 

5. METABOLIC TRAINING: 2-6 min

a. Burn extra calories and perform more work, without overloading the muscular system

b. Short, intense burst followed  by incomplete recovery.

c. Tabata protocol is a very popular example – 20s work/10s rest, performed for 4 min
NOTE:the Tabata “craze” has gotten kinda out of hand, as many people are mis-using the format. You must perform a HIGH-intensity movement for the work period and basically go all-out. No squats, push-ups, lunges, etc. I will admit that over two years ago when the Tabata craze really blew up, I was guilty of mis-using it myself. Live and learn! Anyhow, keep the intensity high and the movements simple so you can crank it up!

Swingin' the sledge is no joke!

Examples of exercises:

  1. Kettlebell Swings
  2. Sprints
  3. Burpees
  4. Squat Jumps
  5. Jumping Jacks
  6. Jump Rope
  7. Battle Ropes
  8. Sledgehammer Swings
  9. Med Ball Slams

6. RECOVERY/REGENERATION: 5 min

*Cool-down with static stretching and additional SMR

Copyright © 2011 Sarah E. Rippel/Rippel Effect Fitness
The information on this page may not be reproduced or republished on another webpage or website. Please LINK TO RIPPEL EFFECT FITNESS instead (I LOVE IT when you link to my page, especially without asking my permission!)  

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One response

  1. Pingback: -Mobility Drills For Triathletes- « RIPPEL EFFECT FITNESS

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